Posted in dialysis, helper, Kidney failure

In memory of a helper


This morning I want to jog the memory of our Creator – not that He forgets anything – but just to bring about the good attributes of a man I have known since my childhood days.

This is a man who joined as a Lathe operator in our Industrial Unit called ‘Nirla Industries’ which was operational for about six years during the year 1970’s. Having little education, he chose to take up this job under my (late) father, to contribute to his big family comprising of his parents and seven siblings.  Over the years he got well accustomed to our family and my Aunt’s family who were closest to us.

He loved my father as a boss, mentor and leader, he respected and adored him.

Lately I got to know that he is suffering from kidney failure and need dialysis every alternate day.  As I was thinking about him, I realized what a blessing this man has been to our family and to my Aunt’s family.

He went out of his way many times to make life easy and comfortable for us, selflessly lending a hand in order to first assure our personal fortification rather than his.

I remember he would take my brother in his cycle to buy stuff for home, accompany me from tuitions late in the evening, get my Aunt’s daughters from school, fix a bulb, repair broken furniture’s, set up our store room, paint the house for Christmas, decorate home, build a crib, pay our bills, buy movie tickets and hold seats for us using his handkerchief (in those days theatres didn’t have seat numbers), stop the bus for us, call an auto, get medicines from the store, carry all the grocery and drop it at home and yet he would ask – “is it all or is there any other work to do”?

This young man was a great moral support to us when Hydrophobia took my father’s life. He was devastated and confounded with grief at the thought of his mentor gone so soon.  My father and he shared a superb relationship, communicating like friends at the comfort of our home, but having a boss – worker relationship at the Factory.  My dad was his tutor, sharing his lives struggles and victories and giving him clues to make life easier to live.

He was a tremendous support to my Aunt’s family and her two daughters as well – I mean he made time for our family – and today as I look back, I can marvel at the sacrifices he made to meet our needs.  He seldom criticized or complained, but seemed to have had plenty of compassion and mercy.  I lost my Uncle just two years after I lost my Dad and he took on, all the funeral work, from start to the finish.

There were struggles and inadequacies, blunders that brought debt in his own life, yet he came when we needed him.

His countless acts of timely help done might be small in nature, but to my family and me, it is truly larger than the world itself!  As I am writing this I am amazed at the number of years this man served us and kept serving us.  Yes, though we reciprocated it various times, I think it is still not enough.

In those years, he became a regular visitor to our home – and I must mention here that this young man had integrity – he was unpretentious in his acquaintance with us – knowing fully well that if he did anything immoral it would irk or disregard everything his mentor (my father) did to build his life.

So he maintained his admiration and we respect him and his association with us for all those years.

Now he is with his family – wife and two sons – but having a failed kidney, needing dialysis and needing finances for his treatment.

Am sure that his financial need would somehow be met, but our family’s desire is that he would experience a miracle, a touch of God restoring his life back together, that he may know Him and be saved.  For all the times this man has given and been of service to us, we pray God would give him back a thirty, sixty and a hundred fold blessing.

My request to all of you who read this blog, please pray for this brother to get his miracle soon.

His name is Sagay Nathan (the first name literally means the ‘one who helps’).

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